Who am I ?

My interest in medicine dates back to my student years. In 1981, I completed a six-year study course in the Faculty of Medicine of the Medical University of Gdańsk. After graduation, I completed a 12-month internship at different departments of the Medical University of Gdańsk while simultaneously working at the Outpatient Clinic and Hospital of the Gdańsk Shipyard. Striving to provide care to patients with rheumatic diseases, I had to complete a specialty in internal medicine. My pursuit of this started when I began working at the Railway Hospital in Tczew a year after the completion of my postgraduate internship. As one of the hospital physicians was a rheumatologist, I had the opportunity to be involved in the treatment of patients with rheumatic diseases from the very start. I then moved to Grudziądz, where I collaborated with another rheumatologist at the Internal Medicine Department of the Municipal Hospital. In those years, most Polish patients with rheumatic diseases were diagnosed and treated at internal medicine departments. In 1985, I passed my first specialty examination and pursued a specialty in rheumatology at the current Nicolaus Copernicus University Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz. My specialty internships were at the Rheumatology Clinic in Bydgoszcz and the Institute of Rheumatology in Warsaw. At the same time, I was employed at an outpatient rheumatology clinic in Grudziądz, and I obtained my specialty in rheumatology in 1987. I ended my employment at state hospitals in 1992 for two reasons: there was little prospect of further professional development and the diagnostic and therapeutic conditions were poor. I focused instead on my private practice, where I treated motor organ disorders.

From 1992 to 2005, I looked for novel methods to treat rheumatic diseases so that I was able to help the increasing number of patients who called me from right across the country. During this period, I completed a training course in manual therapy, as well as a course in homeopathy. In addition to conventional rheumatological treatment, my treatment methods included laser bio-stimulation, magnetic fields, electroacupuncture, cryotherapy, ozone therapy, and homeopathic medications.

In 2005, I concluded that it would be difficult to obtain further advances in the treatment of my patients. Therefore, I decided to move to the United Kingdom to become familiar with alternative treatment approaches. Between 2006 and 2013, I mainly worked as a contract physician in the UK. As a consequence, I had the opportunity to familiarize myself with the treatment methods that British rheumatology clinics employed. Overall, I worked at 17 different hospitals.

Changing jobs every few months, I became familiar with various ways of managing cases that were difficult and unclear from the perspective of the official medical doctrine. Despite explicit guidelines and officially imposed management structures, the treatment methods and problem-solving approaches of each hospital differed slightly.

Some hospitals preferred sulfasalazine treatment, while others preferred methotrexate or leflunomide. Similarly, differences could be observed regarding combinations of the disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). This was mainly due to local experience and attempts to search for better solutions. Most specialists involved in the treatment of rheumatic diseases are well aware of the imperfections of their therapeutic methods and the flaws of the official guidelines. Having returned to Poland, I wrote a guide entitled, How to Treat Arthritis.

Over a short period of time, my clinic was flooded with hundreds and then thousands of patients who had been unable to make any improvement using the treatments they had been prescribed to date. Since medicine and, in particular, the treatment of rheumatic diseases had always been my hobby, calling and joy, I decided to focus my efforts on the search for novel ways to cure rheumatoid arthritis.